Making a difference for Dr. Marke in Africa

When Dr. Dennis Marke graduated from Loma Linda [Calif.] University this past summer, a new world awaited him back in Africa. The doctor came to the United States from Sierra Leone, which has the highest maternal and infant mortality rate in the world. To many of us, Marke’s accounts of young mothers and the babies who die because villages have no doctors or midwives are simply sad stories, but to Marke, they are the realities of his life as an African doctor.

In Africa, Marke’s served the United Methodist Kissy Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone. His salary was paid for by the Indiana Conference through its Operation Doctor mission program.

“I wanted to go and meet people in their communities and empower them with knowledge and programs to help them prevent the diseases that are killing them,” he explained.

To bring solutions to his home country, he knew he needed more training in public health. He came to the United States as a World Communion Scholar, studying maternal and child health, as well as health education and promotion.

His studies in the United States were made possible because caring United Methodists gave generously on previous World Communion Sundays. In today’s economy, your contributions are needed more than ever. Your gifts help racial and ethnic minority students in the United States and international students. Like Dennis, they want to serve God in life-changing ministries:

Your generous gifts provide:

  • World Communion Scholarships (General Board of Global Ministries), with at least one-half of the annual amount for ministries beyond the United States;
  • Ethnic Scholarship Program (General Board of Higher Education and Ministry); and
  • Ethnic In-Service Training Program (General Board of Higher Education and Ministry).

For more information about Special Sunday Offerings, visit www.umcgiving.org.


“I wanted to go and meet people in their communities and empower them with knowledge and programs…”

– Dennis Marke