Mastora Bakhiet, a native and immigrant of Darfur now living in Fort Wayne, Ind., told her personal story and story of Sudanese government oppression to more than 50 women during an hour-long break-out session during the South Indiana School of Christian Mission at the University of Indianapolis on July 21. She was accompanied by her husband and son. Sensing impending danger, they left Darfur in 2000 for the United Arab Emirates from where they immigrated to the United States in 2004 through a lottery system. Bakhiet, founder of the Darfur Women Network, a grassroots non-profit based in Fort Wayne, said Darfurian women face many challenges including: information and connection, family responsibilities (many times without adult males), homeland obligation to their people and most recently this year, the expulsion of 13 non-government relief aid organizations from Darfur, who were providing hands-on food, water, education and health relief in UN-run displacement camps with up to 150,000 refugees each living in barren rural areas of Darfur and Chad. Bakhiet and her family see little hope for the future of the Darfurian people. Her presentation was part of the geographic study being presented throughout the United States this year in the General Board of Global Ministries Schools of Christian Mission. More than 150 women, men, youth and children attended the school at UIndy this week. – e-HUM

Mastora-Bakhiet

Mastora Bakhiet, a native and immigrant of Darfur now living in Fort Wayne, Ind., shares her personal story and story of Sudanese government oppression during the South Indiana School of Christian Mission at the University of Indianapolis on July 21.